Primitive culture: researches into the development of mythology, philosophy, religion, art, and custom, Volume 2

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Page 55 - Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men ! 16 For he hath broken the gates of brass, and cut the bars of iron in sunder.
Page 386 - ... an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD. 6 Т And if his offering for a sacrifice of peace offering unto the LORD be of the flock ; male or female, he shall offer it without blemish.
Page 286 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crown'd, Look'st from thy sole dominion, like the god Of this new world, at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminish'd heads, to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state 1 fell, how glorious once above thy sphere...
Page 387 - To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me ? saith the LORD : I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts ; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he-goats.
Page 82 - Though they dig into hell, thence shall mine hand take them; though they climb up to heaven, thence will I bring them down: And though they hide themselves in the top of Carmel, I will search and take them out thence; and though they be hid from my sight in the bottom of the sea, thence will I command the serpent, and he shall bite them...
Page 43 - To those whose talents are above mediocrity, the highest subjects may be announced. To those who are below mediocrity, the highest subjects may not be announced.' CHAP. XX. Fan Ch'ih asked what constituted wisdom. The Master said, To give one's self earnestly to the duties due to men, and, while respecting spiritual beings, to keep aloof from them, may be called wisdom.
Page 20 - MACGREGOR (J.)- Rob Roy on the Jordan, Nile, Red Sea, Gennesareth, &c. A Canoe Cruise in Palestine and Egypt and the Waters of Damascus.
Page 144 - After the scole of Stratford atte Bowe, For Frensch of Parys was to hire unknowe. At mete" wel i-taught was sche withalle ; Sche leet no morsel from hire lippes falle, Ne wette hire fyngres in hire sauce deepe. Wel cowde sche carie a morsel, and wel keepe, That no drope
Page 113 - Its principles are not difficult to understand, for they plainly keep up the social relations of the living world. The dead ancestor, now passed into a deity, simply goes on protecting his own family and receiving suit and service from them as of old ; the dead chief still watches over his own tribe, still holds his authority by helping friends and harming enemies, still rewards the right and sharply punishes the wrong.
Page 253 - We must not be surprised," he says, " at finding, on a close examination, that the characters of all the Pagan deities, male and female, melt into each other and at last into one or two; for it seems a well-founded opinion, that the whole crowd of gods and goddesses in ancient Rome, and modern Varanes [Benares] mean only the powers of nature, and principally those of the Sun, expressed in a variety of ways and by a multitude of fanciful names.

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