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MIDNIGHT MUSINGS:

BEING

A COLLECTION

OF

POEMS

ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS..

THOUGHTS that voluntary move
Harmonious numbers; as the wakeful bird
Sings darkling, and in shadiest covert hid,
Tunes her nocturnal note.

MILTON

DEMERARA: PRINTED AT THE COURIER OFFICE, 18, SOUTH-STREET,

ii

FREFACE.

KIRKE WHITE, he can with truth make use of his own expressive words:

For me the day
Hath duties which require the vigorous hand
Of steadfast application, but which leave
No deep improving trace upon the mind.
But be the day another's let it passo
The night's my own; they cannot steal my night!

It has been chiefly in the night season that the Au.. thor has taken from the hours allotted to repose, and amused himself with the composition of these Poemsthus "lengtbening his days by stealing a few hours from the night;" and it will be allowed, he trusts, as some palliation for any carelessness or undue haste that may be discerned in them, that to the performance he has generally not brought a mind as free from the ordinary thoughts of every-day life, as is required for that play, of fancy or of feeling, of which a candidate for Poetical honours ought always to be in possession; this also must be his excuse for the general sombre and melancholy tone which pervades most of his Poetry; which, it may be, bas derived its gloomy hue from the surrounding darkness and solitude which have invariably attended these midnight musings.

The Author feels that another charge may be brought against him-namely, that in a Work written by a Demerarian, composed and published in the Colony, ibore is not one Poem which possesses the charm of.

PREFACE.

In offering to his fellow-Colonists a volume of Poems, principally composed among them, the Author would have been well pleased to have let them stand or fall by their own merit, had he been satisfied with the execution of what may be termed the mechanical part of the performance, which, as it is the least exalted, is undoubtedly the most tedious and irksome :-- the revision and correction for the Press, of that which has been negligently composed in the first instance. This, how. ever, with regard to Works (and especially Poetical ones) subject to public criticism, is more imporiant than perhaps it appears to be; and the Author, in making his first appearance, feels a characteristic nervousness which has induced him to preface the Work with a few observations, intended as a propitiation for many errors and negligences, which he himself is most ready to admit may be fairly charged on the few Poems now published. And first, without meaning to compare himself in any other way with the lamented

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