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MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 372

Remonstrating on what he had written to Herbert: satisfactory

progress of the Iconographia Scotica : thanks for Lord
Buchan's drawings, and eulogiums on them; and historical
and other queries.-Jan. 10, 1795.

EARL OF ORFORD TO MR. PINKERTON.

379

Respecting a portrait of James IV., and the Iconographia

Scotica, and some portraits falsely named in Grammont's
Memoirs.--Jan. 25, 1795.

SIR JOSEPH BANKS TO MR. PINKERTON.

Regrets bis inability to forward his views respecting the British

Museum.-Feb. 1, 1795.

EARL OF ORFORD TO MR. PINKERTON.

382

On the same subject as the preceding.–Feb. 5, 1795.

MR. DOUCE TO MR. PINKERTON.

383

Pointing out some Scotch portraits, and putting two historical
queries.-April 6, 1795.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN.

384

On the Iconographia Scotica, and the prejudiccs of the Scotch
against him.-June 15, 1795.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 385

Farther particulars respecting the Iconographia Scotica.-

July 6, 1795.

MR. JAMES SCOTT TO MR. JAMES WRIGHT, JUN. 387

Respecting a portrait of the first Earl of Kinnoul and a series
of portraits at Scone Palace.-Aug. 3, 1795.

MR. J. C. WALKER TO MR. PINKERTON.

390

On some portraits of the Grammont family; the death of Dr.

Campbell; and his own intention of publishing a tour
through the British Isles in 1635.-Aug. 7, 1795.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 392

On the progress of the Iconographia Scotica.-Sept. 25, 1795.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 392

Discovery of a portrait of James IV. with a falcon on bis

fist.-Oct. 19, 1795.

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MR. SHAW TO MR. PINKERTON.

397

Particulars of a manuscript of Fordun's Scotichronicon in
C. C. C. Library, Cambridge.-Jan. 25, 1796.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 398

Full of complaints and irritability about the Iconographia

Scotica.-Feb. 28, 1796.

MR. CONSTABLE TO MR. PINKERTON.

400

Respecting books printed in Scotland between 1650 and 1660,

and artists at Edinburgh.—March 20, 1796.

MR. PENNANT TO MR. PINKERTON.

401

Allows of his copying the monument of Earl Douglas in his

Tour, and acknowledges that his portrait of Cardinal Beaton
is not genuine.- April 30, 1796.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN. 402

Respecting portraits of Sir Robert Murray and other eminent
Scotchmen.--April 16, 1796.

SIR JOHN SINCLAIR TO MR. PINKERTON. 404

Enclosing the following letter from Mr. Pinkerton.—May 15,

1796.

EARL OF BREADALBANE TO MR. PINKERTON. 410

Respecting the portraits by Jameson at Taymouth.—May 28,

1796.

MR. PINKERTON TO THE EARL OF BUCHAN.

412

Upon the subject of the Iconographia Scotica.-May 30, 1796.

SIR WILLIAM OUSELEY TO MR. PINKERTON. 416

Respecting his projected translation of Sadi's Bostan, and Ne-

zami's History of Alexander and his Persian Miscellanles.-

July 7, 1796.

-MR. OGILVIE TO MR. PINKERTON.

417

Respecting portraits of Morison the botanist, and others at

Aberdeen.—July 19, 1796.

MR. J. C. WALKER TO MR. PINKERTON.

419

With various literary information.-Aug. 30, 1796.

MR. R. JOHNSON TO MR. PINKERTON.

421

Remarks on the style of engraving best suited for portraits.-

Sept. 17, 1796.

MESSRS. MORISON & SON TO MR. PINKERTON. 423

On the death of Mr. Johnson.-Nov. 18, 1796.

Page MR. J. C. WALKER TO MR. PINKERTON.

425 His increasing fondness for Italian literature, and his opinion

of Gibbon's Memoirs.-Nov. 21, 1796.

MR. A. STUART TO MR. PINKERTON.

428 Respecting a charter granted by Sir John Stuart to the Abbot

of Melross.-Nov. 30, 1796.

MR. J. C. WALKER TO MR. PINKERTON.

430 Sending a translation of some Irish romances, and criticising Farmer's Essay on the Learning of Shakspeare.-- Jan. 14, 1797. MR. M. LAING TO MR. PINKERTON.

433 On the Gowrie conspiracy.-Jan. 17, 1797.

437

MR. DILLY TO MR. PINKERTON.
Announces the publication of his History of Scotland.-Jan.

26, 1797.

439

MR. PINKERTON TO MR. M. LAING.
His own intention of publishing a tract on the Gowrie Conspi-

racy, and recommendations to Mr. Laing to write a History of Scotland under the Commonwealth, and offering bim anecdotes of Cromwell.-Jan. 28, 1797.

MR. M. LAING TO MR. PINKERTON.

442 Anecdotes concerning the Gowrie Conspiracy: a history of

Scotland during the Commonwealth would be uninteresting: impression made on him by Pinkerton's Inquiry.-Feb. 9,1797. DR. GILLIES TO MR. PINKERTON.

447 Acknowledging the receipt of bis History.-Feb. 16, 1797.

CORRESPONDENCE.

DR. BEATTIE TO MR. PINKERTON.*

Aberdeen, December 13th, 1775. I have been so much engrossed with business and bad health, that till this day I could not find leisure to answer your very obliging letter. Your intention of inscribing to me your poem on Craig. millar Castle, does me much more honor than I have any title to. Please to accept of my best thanks for this instance of your kind partiality, and for the obliging manner in which you speak of what I have attempted in poetry.

There are many good lines in your poem; but,

* At the time of writing the letter to which this is an answer, Mr. Pinkerton was in his clerkship to Mr. Aytoun of Edinburgh, and was only seventeen years old. The Elegy on Craigmillar Castle was published in 1776, with a dedication to Dr. Beattie, who acknowledges the favor and the receipt of four copies, in a letter dated 20th July, 1776, but not published here.

VOL. I.

A

when you have kept it by you a week or two, I fancy you will not think it correct enough as yet to appear in public. Young poets are very apt to publish their pieces immediately on writing them out; but they ought always to keep them for a year, or at least for several months, and revise them from time to time. I have erred in this way myself, and therefore can warn them from my own experience.

You will see I have been very free in my remarks, which I hope you will excuse; for I did it with a most friendly intention. On these occasions, I think it is the duty of a friend to be as critical as possible.

I heartily wish you success in your studies, and am with much regard and esteem.

DR. BEATTIE TO MR. PINKERTON..

Aberdeen, March 9th, 1776.

I thank you for taking in so good part the freedom of my former criticism : I hope the present will not offend you. I have been for some time past in a very bad state of health ; afflicted

• To this letter I have annexed the critical annotations of Dr. Beattie, to show at oncé some of the most striking errors of a young author, and the remarks of so able a critic and so distinguished a poet as the author of The Minstrel. Many other of the letters are accompanied with even longer series of remarks, but I have not felt it to be desirable to introduce them.

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