Secret Societies and Subversive Movements

Front Cover
Theophania Publishing, 2010 - Freemasonry - 192 pages
Thank you for checking out this book by Theophania Publishing. We appreciate your business and look forward to serving you soon. We have thousands of titles available, and we invite you to search for us by name, contact us via our website, or download our most recent catalogues. The object of the present book is in the tracing the course secret societies. I shall rely as far as possible on the documents and admissions of their members, on which point I have been able to collect a great deal of fresh data entirely corroborating my former thesis. It should be understood that I do not propose to give a complete history of secret societies, but only of secret societies in their relation to the revolutionary movement. I shall therefore not attempt to describe the theories of occultism nor to enquire into the secrets of Freemasonry, but simply to relate the history of these systems in order to show the manner in which they have been utilized for a subversive purpose. If I then fail to convince the incredulous that secret forces of revolution exist, it will not be for want of evidence.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2010)

Nesta Helen Webster (24 August 1876 - 16 May 1960) was a controversial historian, occultist, and author who revived conspiracy theories about the Illuminati. She argued that the secret society's members were occultists, plotting communist world domination, using the idea of a Jewish cabal, the Masons and Jesuits as a smokescreen. According to her, their international subversion included the French Revolution, 1848 Revolution, the First World War, the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. In 1920, Webster was one of the contributing authors who wrote the The Jewish Peril, a series of articles in the London Morning Post, centered on the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. These articles were subsequently compiled and published in the same year, in book form under the title of the The Cause of World Unrest. She was cited respectfully by Winston Churchill, "This movement among the Jews ... as Mrs. Webster, has so ably shown, [played] a definitely recognizable part in the tragedy of the French Revolution" Webster claimed that the authenticity of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion was an open question. Her position on that, in 1924, "Contrary to the assertions of certain writers, I never affirmed my belief in the authenticity of the Protocols, but have always treated it as an entirely open question." She also believed she was a countess in a previous life, who was guillotined by French revolutionaries. At one time she was a member of the British Union of Fascists.

Bibliographic information