Geoffrey Chaucer's the Prologue to the Book of the Tales of Canterbury: The Knight's Tale; The Nun's Priest's Tale

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Macmillan, 1902 - English language - 337 pages

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Page 264 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and wat'ry depths; all these have vanished; They live no longer in the faith of reason ! But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names...
Page 137 - Or elles, if free choys be graunted me To do that same thing, or do it noght, Though god forwoot it, er that it was wroght ; Or if his witing streyneth nevere a del But by necessitee condicionel.
Page 11 - Or with a bretherhed to been withholde; But dwelte at hoom, and kepte wel his folde, So that the wolf ne made it nat miscarie ; He was a shepherde and no mercenarie. And though he holy were, and vertuous, He was to sinful man nat despitous, Ne of his speche daungerous ne digne, But in his teching discreet and benigne.
Page 3 - Souninge in moral vertu was his speche, And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.
Page 2 - For him was lever have at his beddes heed Twenty bokes, clad in blak or reed, Of Aristotle and his philosophye, Than robes riche, or fithele, or gay sautrye.
Page 20 - In Southwerk, at this gentil hostelrye, That highte the Tabard, faste by the Belle. But now is tyme to yow for to telle How that we baren us that ilke night, Whan we were in that hostelrye alight. And after wol I telle of our viage, And al the remenaunt of our pilgrimage.
Page 125 - Seyde he nat thus, ne do no fors of dremes? Now, sire," quod she, "whan we flee fro the bemes, For Goddes love, as...

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