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I may be wrong about this, Mr. Macy, but I think not. Well, I must close, for I expect I have written more now than you will read. We are having remarkable fine weather, and the people here are improving the time and getting ready for winter. I hope you will write soon, and I will try and answer sooner next time. So good-by.

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C, Ind., Nov. 19, 1872. MR. MACY: Dear Sir.-I received a letter last Friday night, from my friend J. B-, of Yale College, desiring me to write to you. I do so with pleasure. I have been living at the same place in T-Co. I started here to college in September, and am going to (God willing) go through. I will probably study for the ministry, but am not yet certain. I came to this town, August 17th, 1865. I desire to hear from all the friends in New York, especially my brother and sister, and you would do me a kindness to let me know all about them, as I have not heard from them since I left the city. Please write and let me know about Henry F. and my former schoolmates and companions. I would like to know about each one of them, whether they are leading good or bad lives. Also, please let me know where Mrs. B- lives, as I desire to write and ask her some questions. I have been blest with good health, which I am very thankful for, and I hope you are enjoying the same blessing. Give my best respects to Mrs. M. and Miss H. and all inquiring friends, and please write soon.

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MR. MACY: Dear Sir.-It is with pleasure I take the chance of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am enjoying pretty good health, although I have had some pretty good spells of the ague; therefore I have not got to write to you sooner. It has been snowing a pretty good snow-storm here to-day. I received your letter, and also the paper, and was glad to hear from you. I do not

know of any man that I would care to bind myself to, so I think I will continue to work out by the month. I can get pretty good wages here in this country.

I have bought me two pigs, and intend to buy me a calf or two against winter, and keep on buying stock as my means will permit; and after a while, I will be able to buy me a team against I am of age. I will then go farther out West, and get me some land. I went to school last winter, and am going again this winter, and I intend to try to learn all I can. Well, I will bring my letter to a close. Excuse poor writing. Write soon. From

J. N.

THE DANGEROUS CLASSES OF NEW YORK,

AND

Twenty Years' Work among them.

BY CHARLES L. BRACE,

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AUTHOR OF "HUNGARY IN '51," "HOME LIFE IN GERMANY," "THE NORSE FOLK," RACES OF THE "6 OLD WORLD," THE NEW WEST," " NEWSBOYS' SERMONS," ETC., ETC.

"Altogether, we know of no work which deals more wisely with some of the gravest social evils of a highly artificial civilization."-London Saturday Review.

"This is one of the most facinating and authentic volumes of the kind ever issued from the New York press."-Sunday Times.

The object of the book is to give facts with reference to the dangerous, destitute and criminal classes of New York; to discuss the causes of crime and pauperism, and the best methods of removing them, and to show, in detail, with incidents, the long labors among these classes by the workers under the Children's Aid Society. The subjects of some of the chapters are as follows :—

The Condition of Neglected Children before Christianity-The Proletaires of New York-Gangs of Youthful Criminals-The Causes of Crime-Weakness of Marriage Tie-Over-crowding-Intemperance-Homeless Boys-Girl VagrantsLegal Treatment of Prostitutes-Criminal Children of Fourth Ward-German Rag-pickers-The Best Treatment for Foundlings and Criminal Children-The Reformed Pugilist and Free Reading-rooms-Petty Thieves and Compulsory Education-Organization of Charities and State Aid--Decrease of Juvenile Crime in New York-History of the Children's Aid Society-Swill-gatherers of Dutch Hill-Scenes among the Poor-Lodging-houses-The Young Vagrants-Religious Teaching-Incidents of the Work, etc., etc.

Among the wood-cuts illustrating the book is one of the "Fortunes of a Waif," showing him in different stages of his destitute and criminal life; another of the "Low Lodging-houses of New York;" and then, as a contrast, the "Newsboys' Lodging-house;" another of the "Street Boy" as he appears entering the Lodginghouse, and then as he is on a Western farm; another of "Street Arabs," "The Unfortunate," etc., etc.

THE BOOK IS A HANDSOMELY PRINTED AND ILLUSTRATED VOLUME OF 450 PAGES.

SOLD ONLY BY SUBSCRIPTION.

WYNKOOP & HALLENBECK, PUBLISHERS,

113 Fulton street, New York.

[Senate No. 11.]

5

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

TO THE

CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1872.

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An American living abroad, for Newsboys' Lodging-house

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A mite for Christmas at the Newsboys' Lodging-house..

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A mite for poor children, from J. B. D.....

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A small sum from a small Sunday-school..

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A little sick boy, to give some well boy a Merry Christmas

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A Christmas thank-offering from children of Presbyterian Sunday

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