The Cotton Question: The Production, Export, Manufacture, and Consumption of Cotton. A Condensed Treatise on Cotton in All Its Aspects: Agricultural, Commercial, and Political

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Metropolitan Record Office, 1866 - African American agricultural laborers - 251 pages

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Page 205 - ... until the numbers were reduced to two or three moths to each plate, when it was abandoned as being no longer worthy of the trouble. The crop that year was but very little injured by the boll-worm. The flics were caught in their eagerness to feed upon the mixture by alighting into it and being unable to escape...
Page 100 - States,) available for home consumption, has of late years been falling off at the rate of 1,000 bales a week, while our consumption has been increasing during the same period at the rate of 3,600 bales a week. 3. That the United States is the only country where the growth of cotton is on the increase ; and that there even the increase...
Page 100 - ... bales annually, which is barely sufficient to supply the- increasing demand for its own consumption, and for the continent of Europe. 4. That no stimulus of price can materially augment this annual increase, as the planters always grow as much cotton as the negro population can pick. 5. That, consequently, if the cotton manufacture of Great Britain is to increase at all, on its present footing...
Page 204 - ... a white spot, are also discovered on the margin. The under wings are lighter colored, with a broad black border on the margin, and also veined distinctly with the same color. In the black border, however, there 'is a brownish-yellow spot, of the same color as the rest of the under wing, which is more distinct in some specimens than in others, but may be plainly perceived.
Page 100 - That no stimulus of price can materially augment this annual increase, as the planters always grow as much cotton as the negro population can pick. 5. That, consequently, if the cotton manufacture of Great Britain is to increase at all, on its present footing, it can only be enabled to do so by applying a great stimulus to the growth of cotton in other countries adapted for the culture.
Page 230 - There is also said to be another species of "sore-shin," to which the young cotton-plant is liable, differing entirely from that occasioned by careless hoeing, the cause of which is attributed by many to cold, cutting winds, when the plant is very young. Others, however, assert that, when a high wind shakes the tender plant, the main stem is so much bent and twisted, that the sap-vessels are upturned, and a serious injury occurs ; but the wound is sometimes healed, and if the cotton grows vigorously...
Page 203 - Columbus, has bred both insects, and declares them to be the same ; and moreover, when, according to his advice, the corn was carefully wormed, on two or three plantations, the boll-worms did not make their appearance that season on the cotton ; notwithstanding on neighboring plantations they committed great ravages. The worms...
Page 129 - raw cotton " would insure it, but it may be accomplished without it. Having determined that the mills must come to the cotton, which is but one move, whilst sending the cotton to the mills is a heavy annual, perpetual tax, it is proper to inquire if cotton growers can get up the spindles and looms among the fields. The following facts answer the question in the affirmative most distinctly. We estimate the crop at 2,300,000 bales. The factories now in the United States require of this 600,000 bales...
Page 59 - ... grains. The ash contains phosphate of lime, sulphate of lime, soda, potash, and chlorine. From the composition of this sub-soil, it will appear that deep, or sub-soil, ploughing is indicated as appropriate for this plantation; for the sub-soil is richer in certain important ingredients than the surface soil, as will be seen on comparing the proportions of soda and of phosphoric acid. Analysis of the ash of a Long Staple (Sea Island) Cotton plant taken from the same soil as above. The stalk of...

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