Studying the Parables of Jesus

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Smyth & Helwys Publishing, Inc., 1999 - Religion - 378 pages
Peter Rhea Jones has spent the majority of his career studying and teaching the parables. Studying the Parables of Jesus is a primer on the historical and -literary approaches to biblical study. It informs and inspires in dialogue with contemporary methods and contemporary meanings. It provides an introduction to the methods of interpretation of the parables as well as an opening chapter on the recent history of interpretation. The chapters of exegesis approach a select group of parables for a more intensive analysis. While reserving much of the technical details for the endnotes, the text includes -discussion of critical issues and alternative opinions. Questions and exercises are appended at the close of each chapter for personal use or classroom -discussion.

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I feel like this person uses the same information over and over. I know there is only one source to work from (the bible), but at least TRY to use alternate sources. Of all the works of historians, I think that Jones did not want to cite anyone in the work but himself.

Contents

The Nature of Parables
20
Special Literary Considerations
47
Impetus to Hearing and Hoping
62
An Appeal to Religious Imagination
84
An Invitation to Faith
100
Prophetic Call for National Repentance
123
Exposure fo Inauthentic Existence
142
Call to Existential Decision
163
Gospel for the Lost
215
Portrait of Radical Grace and Stunning Penitence
237
The Imperative of Forgiveness
263
The Love Command in Parable
294
Pastoral Call to Perseverance
325
Preaching and Teaching the Parables
348
Index
370
237
373

Gospel for the Lost
196

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About the author (1999)

Peter Rhea Jones is adjunct professor at the McAfee School of Theology of Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia, and senior pastor of First Baptist Church in Decatur, Georgia.

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