Philosophical Magazine

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Taylor & Francis., 1880 - Physics
 

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Page 437 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it.
Page 477 - Guineas each, with every requisite to assist those commencing the study of this interesting science, a knowledge of which affords so much pleasure to the traveller in all parts of the world. * A collection for Five Guineas which will illustrate the recent works on Geology by Ansted, Buckland.
Page 476 - THE ANNALS AND MAGAZINE OF NATURAL HISTORY, INCLUDING ZOOLOGY, BOTANY, AND GEOLOGY.
Page 168 - It must be admitted that such a diagram is not quite so simple to draw as one might wish it to be; but then consider what the alternative is if one undertakes to deal with five terms and all their combinations — nothing short of the disagreeable task of writing out, or in some way putting before us, all the 32 combinations involved.
Page 101 - I call a circular toroid a simple ring generated by the revolution of any singlycircumferential closed plane curve round any axis in its plane not cutting it. A "tore," following French usage, is a ring generated by the revolution of a circle round any line in its plane not cutting it. Any simple ring, or any solid with a single hole through it, may be called a toroid ; but to deserve this appellation it had better be not very unlike a tore. The endless closed axis of a toroid is a line through its...
Page 113 - ... the canal. The more approximately nodal character of the tides on the north coast of the English Channel than on the south or French coast, and of the tides on the west or Irish side of the Irish Channel than on the east or English side, is probably to be accounted for on the principle represented by this factor, taken into account along with frictional resistance, in virtue of which the tides of the English Channel may be roughly represented by more powerful waves travelling from west to east,...
Page 484 - Table of the corrections for temperature to reduce observations to 32° Fahrenheit for Barometers with brass scales extending from the cistern to the top of the mercurial column.
Page 339 - Now, it has been well pointed out by Thomson, that, looked at in this light, the universe is a system that had a beginning and must have an end; for a process of degradation cannot be eternal. If we could view the universe as a candle not lit, then it is perhaps conceivable to regard it as having been always in existence; but if we regard it rather as & candle that has been lit, we become absolutely certain that it cannot have been burning from eternity, and that a time will come when it will cease...
Page 159 - The problem thus solved is the finding of the periodic disturbance in the motion of rotating liquid in a space between two boundaries which are concentric circular cylindric when undisturbed, produced by infinitely small simple harmonic normal motion of these boundaries, distributed over them according to the simple harmonic law in respect to the coordinates z, 6.
Page 102 - ... regular helix lies on a circular cylinder. Let a be the radius of the circle thus formed by the axis of the closed helix ; let r denote the radius of the cross section of the ideal toroid on the surface of which the helix lies, supposed small in comparison with a ; and let 6 denote the inclination of the helix to the normal section of the toroid. We have...

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