The Silver Book of English Sonnets: A Selection of Less-known Sonnets

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Robert Lynd
The Pleiad, 1927 - Sonnets, English - 51 pages

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Page 37 - CYRIACK, this three years' day these eyes, though clear, To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot ; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman.
Page 20 - How oft, when thou, my music, music play'st Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds With thy sweet fingers, when thou gently sway'st The wiry concord that mine ear confounds, Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap To kiss the tender inward of thy hand...
Page 22 - If music and sweet poetry agree, As they must needs, the sister and the brother, Then must the love be great 'twixt thee and me, Because thou lov'st the one, and I the other. Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch Upon the lute doth ravish human sense ; Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such, As, passing all conceit, needs no defence.
Page 13 - LOVING in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain, • Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know, Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain, — I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe; Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain, Oft turning others' leaves, to see if thence would flow Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sunburn'd brain.
Page 36 - License they mean when they cry Liberty ; For who loves that must first be wise and good : But from that mark how far they rove we see, For all this waste of wealth and loss of blood.
Page 33 - I him sought : They told me there, that he was lately gone About some land, which he had dearly bought Long since on earth, to take possession. I straight return'd, and knowing his great birth, Sought him accordingly in great resorts ; In cities, theatres, gardens, parks...
Page 39 - Sons, mothers, maidens withering on the stalk, These all wear out of me, like forms, with chalk Painted on rich men's floors, for one feast-night. Better than such discourse doth silence long, Long, barren silence, square with my...
Page 10 - Ye tradeful merchants, that with weary toil Do seek most precious things to make your gain ; And both the Indias of their treasure spoil ; What needeth you to seek so far in vain ? For lo, my love doth in herself contain All this world's riches that may far be found...
Page 41 - O ! it is pleasant, with a heart at ease, Just after sunset, or by moonlight skies, To make the shifting clouds be what you please, Or let the easily persuaded eyes Own each quaint likeness issuing from the mould Of a friend's fancy; or with head bent low And cheek aslant see rivers flow of gold 'Twixt crimson banks ; and then, a traveller, go From mount to mount through CLOUDLAND, gorgeous land ! Or...
Page 14 - STELLA'S grace. v. Having this day, my horse, my hand, my lance, Guided so well that I obtained the prize, Both by the judgment of the English eyes, And of some sent from that sweet enemy— France ; Horsemen my skill in horsemanship advance, Townsfolk my strength ; a daintier judge applies His praise to sleight, which from good use doth rise...

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