Sketches of the History of Man: In Four Volumes, Volume 4

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United Company of Booksellers, 1775 - Civilization
 

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Page 21 - And they said one to another, We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear; therefore is this distress come upon us.
Page 184 - Is not this the fast that I have chosen? to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free, and that ye break every yoke? Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh?
Page 196 - And when his disciples James and John saw this, they said, Lord, wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven, and consume them, even as Elias did? But he turned, and rebuked them, and said, Ye know not what manner of spirit ye are of. For the Son of man is not come to destroy men's lives, but to save them.
Page 196 - For one believeth that he may eat all things: another, who is weak, eateth herbs. Let not him that eateth despise him that eateth not; and let not him which eateth not judge him that eateth: for God hath received him.
Page 195 - And when Abraham saw that the man blessed not God, he said unto him, 'wherefore dost thou not worship the most high God, Creator of heaven and earth?
Page 175 - Redeem then your souls from destruction while you have the means in your power ; offer presents and tithes to churchmen ; come more frequently to church; humbly implore the patronage of the saints ; for, if you observe these things, you may come with security in the day of retribution to the tribunal of the eternal judge, and say, ' Give to us, O Lord, for we have given unto thee.
Page 90 - There is still more skill required to make a man : by whom then was he -made ? He proceeded from his parents, and they from their parents. But some must have been the first parents.
Page 74 - ... sheepfolds, their pastures, their woods, and their corn-fields : that the other counties of England were in no better condition than Somersetshire, and many of them were even in a worse : that there were at least three or four hundred able-bodied vagabonds in every county who lived by theft and rapine, and who sometimes met in troops to the number of sixty, and committed spoil on the inhabitants...
Page 196 - Let us, therefore, follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another.
Page 184 - I have chofen ? to loofe the bands of wickednefs, to " undo the heavy burdens, and to let the opprefled go '• free, and that. ye break every yoke? Is it not to " deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring " the poor that are caft out, to thy houfe? when thou *' feeft the naked, that thou cover him, and that thou " hide not thyfelf from thine own flefh ()?" The moft extraordinary penance of all, is celibacy, confidered as a religious duty.

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