Conduct is fate [by lady C.S.M. Bury].

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Page 43 - Life of Andrew Melville. Containing Illustrations of the Ecclesiastical and Literary History of Scotland in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Crown 8vo, 6s. History of the Progress and Suppression of the Reformation in Italy in the Sixteenth Century.
Page 68 - From the bent bush, as through the verdant maze Of sweet-briar hedges I pursue my walk ; Or taste the smell of dairy...
Page 43 - I retire from the field, conscious that there remains behind not only a large harvest, but labourers capable of gathering it in. More than one writer has of late displayed talents of this description ; and if the present author, himself a phantom, may be permitted .to distinguish a brother, or perhaps a sister shadow, he would mention, in particular, the author of the very lively work, entitled
Page 267 - Tis not, as heads that never ache suppose, Forgery of fancy and a dream of woes ; Man is a harp whose chords elude the sight, Each yielding harmony, disposed aright, The screws reversed, (a task which if he please God in a moment executes with ease,) Ten thousand thousand strings at once go loose, Lost, till he tune them, all their power and use.
Page 218 - Sincerity ! Thou first of virtues, let no mortal leave Thy onward path! although the earth should gape, And from the gulf of hell destruction cry To take dissimulation's winding way.
Page 64 - Yes, let the rich deride, the proud disdain. These simple blessings of the lowly train ; To me more dear, congenial to my heart, One native charm than all the gloss of art.
Page 121 - Fret not thyself, thou glittering child of pride, That a poor Villager inspires my strain ; With thee let pageantry and Power abide : The gentle Muses haunt the sylvan reign ; Where through wild groves at eve the lonely swain, Enraptured roams, to gaze on Nature's charms.
Page 103 - Seemed with its piercing melody to reach The soul, and in mysterious unison Blend with all thoughts of gentleness and love. Their hearts were open to the healing power Of nature ; and the splendour of the night, The flow of waters, and that sweetest lay Came to them like a copious evening dew Falling on vernal herbs which thirst for rain.
Page 48 - A system of heraldry, speculative and practical, with the true art of blazon according to the most approved heralds in Europe, illustrated with suitable examples of armorial figures and achievements of the most considerable surnames and families in Scotland, &c., together with historical and genealogical memorials relative thereto.
Page 35 - It is not where we have gathered up onr brightest hopes, that the dawn of happiness breaks. It is not where we have glanced our eye with affright, that we find the deadliest gloom. What should this teach us ? To bow to the great and only source of light, and live humbly and with confiding resignation.— Goethe.

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