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5. That, to ensure an effectual performance of what has been recommended, unremitting attention is absolutely required, and quite sufficient to occupy the whole time of an able, intelligent, experienced man.

I cannot close this Report without acknowledging the aid I have derived from the ready and full information afforded by the Agent of the Grand Junction Water Works Company in all that regards water-pipes, &c. &c.

(Signed) THOMAS TELFORD. June, 1824.

APPENDIX, No. III.

OBSERVATIONS COMMUNICATED TO THE AUTHOR, ON

MR. WALKER'S EVIDENCE BEFORE THE SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS, IN 1819.

When Mr. Walker gave evidence before the Select Committee on roads, in 1819, he delivered a section of the Commercial Road paving, and also of the East India road, both of which were printed.

In the same evidence he stated that, for heavy traffic in each direction, it would be an improvement to form the paving on the sides of the road, and leave the middle for light carriages, by which the carmen, when on the footpaths or sides of the road, could be close to their horses, without interrupting or being in danger of accidents from light carriages, and the unpaved part, being in the middle or highest part of the road, would be more easily kept in repair. He delivered a section according to this plan.*

In 1820, two miles of the Middlesex and Essex road, from Whitechapel to Bow, were paved on the above plan. The specification for the contract was prepared by Mr. Walker, and the first part done under his direction. He appears to have taken great pains to ascertain by experiment the proportional durability of different stones; for which purpose he had pieces of equal weight and rubbing surface of Guernsey, Aberdeen, and Peterhead, placed loosely in a frame divided

This plan of paving the sides of a road in place of paving the middle part, as recommended in this work, is no doubt a considerable improvement; but, both for conveniency and durability, the latter plan is decidedly preferable. — THE AUTHOR.

into squares, each stone occupying a square. The frame was moved back and forward for several days on a large block of stone with sand and water between, and the loss of weight noted each day. The Guernsey stood best, and the contract was made for it. This paving has now been in use thirteen years, with almost the heaviest traffic out of London on it, and, except the first year, when the contractor had to keep it up under his agreement, it has cost very little for repairs. It is now in excellent order, and the stones do not appear worn in the smallest degree. The paving is 9 feet wide, with a curb on each side, and the gravelled road between about 32 feet on the average; making the width of the road, exclusive of the footpaths, 50 feet. Much praise for the excellent way in which this

great road has been improved and kept, is due to the chairman of the trustees, John Henry Pelly, Esq. From being at one time the worst, it has, for twenty years, been the best, and is still one of the best roads out of London, and at the same time much the cheapest in point of toll. The tolls allowed by the Act are as under: those actually charged are 25 per cent lower.

d. For a horse, &c. laden or unladen

0 1] For a coach, &c. with five or more horses 1 For ditto, with three or four horses

1 0 For ditto, with two horses

0 6 For ditto, with one horse

0 47 For two-horse cart with wheels from six to nine inches

0 8 For waggon with two or more horses, and

wheels less than six inches in breadth 1 6 For one-horse cart

0 For dray with one or more horses

1 0

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For waggon with one or more horses, and wheels six to nine inches broad

- 1 0 For ditto, if wheels more than nine inches 1 6 Oxen, &c.

0 10 Calves, sheep, &c., per score

0 5 A payment at Mile End gate clears from London to Brentwood (18 miles), and tolls are due only once a day.

The formation of the tramway on the Commercial Road gave Mr. Walker another opportunity of proving the absolute wear and comparative hardness of granites. The experiments were made on pieces of the tram-stone 18 inches wide and a foot deep, which, after being accurately weighed, were laid down in one of the toll-gateways where all the traffic from the East and West India Docks uniformly passed; on being taken up, the stones were again weighed, and the results were as under:

First Series.

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* Budle is a whinstone from Northumberland ; the others are all granites.

+ Herm is an island adjoining Guernsey.

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The second of the above series may be considered the more correct, from the longer duration of the experiment, and from the dressing of the stones of the different descriptions at the time of the first series not being quite equal.

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