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INCOME.

EXPENDITURE.

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S. d.

S.

£

S. d.

£ s. d.
366,212 10 11

Tolls received

· 1,309,014 12

6

303,173

4 O

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Tolls due, but unpaid

39,542 8 1

192,745 16 5

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£

d.
Interest on Debt

Manual Labour
1,348,557 07 Team Labour 578,237 9

One Third sup-
posed Manual

192,745 16 5
Labour
Residue, Team
Labour,

and

385,491 12 10
167,799 10 10 some Improve-

ments
Team Labour, as above
Land purchased, &c.
Repairs, &c.
Salaries, &c.

Repairs and Statute Duty done by
288 5 4 Parishes, and not brought into

Charge
38,648 8 1 Payments, &c. (including Acts of

Parliament, and Improvements
above 1001.)

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Includes Statute Duty and Interest not brought into

Charge.

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s Expenditure above Income, taking the Gross, and

Interest not brought in Charge being added.

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Comparative Statements of the above Years.

1,119 Increase, 94.
19,798 Decrease, 1,077.

3,783 Increase, 1,298.
£7,785,171 Increase, £2,454,678.
£1,455,293 Increase, £366,526.
£1,678,054 Increase, £643,930.
£44,276

£392 Increase, £137 per Mile.
£73 Increase, £21 per Mile.
£85 Increase, £34 per Mile.

* Miles. — From the Manner in which the Account of 1821 was made up, it is not improbable that the Distance was

1821 and 1829.

1821.

1829.

Trusts
Miles*
Acts of Parliament
Debts
Income
Expenditure
Income above Expenditure
Debts per Mile
Income
Expenditure per Mile

1,025 Trusts
20,875 Miles

2,485 Acts of Parliament
£5,330,493

Debts
£1,088,767 Income
£1,034,124 | Expenditure
£54,643 Expenditure above Income

£255 Debts per Mile
£52 Income per Mile
£50 | Expenditure

per Mile

computed, instead of being taken by Admeasurement.

NOTES

NOT E S.

Note A. Page 50.

HOLYHEAD ROAD.

STOWE VALLEY IMPROVEMENT.

Investigation of the best Plan to be adopted for improving

the Road through Stowe Hill Valley. By John Mac

neill. * IN

a great public work of this kind, where a considerable sum of money is to be laid out, it becomes of the greatest importance to ascertain not only what would be the best plan to be adopted, but also to what extent it should be carried, or, in other words, what sum of money should be laid out on the works so as to produce the most advantageous result.

Without altering the entire line of road, as originally proposed by Mr. Telford, which would unquestionably have been the wisest measure, there does not appear to be any means of effecting an improvement of the present line of road, except by embanking across the valley, or lowering the ridges, or by both.

It is evident that each of these plans will admit of

This paper, which was prepared for the Parliamentary Commissioners, was, with their permission, read at the Institution of Civil Engineers. This and the following notes have been furnished by Mr. Macneill.

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