Prayer and Agriculture

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004 - Religion - 456 pages
Foreword by Birger GerhardssonTraditions of the Rabbis from the Era of the New Testament (TRENT) is a major new six-volume work of scholarship that provides an exhaustive collection of early rabbinic traditions and commentary on their relevance to the New Testament. Focusing on 63 rabbinic traditions central to ancient Jewish life, David Instone-Brewer's massive study provides significant insights into Jewish thought and practice prior to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. For each rabbinic tradition considered, the supporting Hebrew source text is provided side by side with an English translation. Instone-Brewer also presents evidence that exists for accurately dating these rabbinic sources -- a critical task recently advanced by modern dating techniques. He goes on to thoroughly discuss the meaning and importance of each rabbinic tradition for Second Temple Judaism, also analyzing any echoes or direct appearances of the tradition in the New Testament writings. In this first TRENT volume, Instone-Brewer examines texts relating to prayer and agriculture. The first section includes texts dealing with when and how to recite the Shema, the Eighteen Benedictions, and other blessings and prayers. The second section contains texts on a wide variety of considerations related to agriculture, such as the "leftovers" to which the poor were entitled, tithing, "mixed" foods and other products, Sabbath Year activities, offerings, and so on. Sure to be a standard reference work for students of both Judaism and Christianity, TRENT provides for the first time a ready resource on rabbinic traditions originating in the New Testament era. Features of TRENT: Discusses 63 tractates that illuminate ancient Jewish lifeFollows the traditional order of subject divisions in the MishnahPresents Hebrew/Aramaic texts in parallel with a literal English translation and notes on variantsProvides dating evidence along with degree of certaintyOffers commentary on the meaning and significance of rabbinic traditions in Second Temple JudaismHighlights the presence of rabbinic traditions in the New Testament writingsIncludes a full glossary of rabbinic terminology

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Contents

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Popular passages

Page 70 - They said to him: Are you a prophet? He replied: I am neither a prophet nor the son of a prophet, but I learnt this from experience.
Page 70 - They sat down and made a note of the exact moment. When they came to R. Gamaliel, he said to them: By the temple service! You have not been a moment too soon or too late, but so it happened: at that very moment the fever left him and he asked for water to drink.
Page 48 - Twice every day, at the dawn thereof, and when the hour comes for turning to repose, let all acknowledge before God the bounties which he has bestowed on them through their deliverance from the land of Egypt: thanksgiving is a natural duty, and is rendered alike in gratitude for past mercies and to incline the giver to others yet to come.
Page 79 - Blessed are you, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has made me according to your will'.
Page 125 - Visits to the sick are considered among the most meritorious acts of true charity. The Talmud lists visiting the sick among those things the fruit of which man eats in this world while the principal remains for him for the world to come (Shabbat 127a).
Page 134 - Sadducaean group, who hold that only those regulations should be considered valid which were written down [in Scripture], and that those which had been handed down by former generations need not be observed.
Page 205 - Neither will I tell you by what authority I do these things." "1 O And he began to speak to them in parables. "A JL jLJi man planted a vineyard, and set a hedge around it, and dug a pit for the wine press, and built a tower, and let it out to tenants, and went into another country.
Page 70 - Hanina my son, pray for him that he may live." He put his head between his knees and prayed for him and he lived. (b) Said R. Yohanan ben Zakkai, "If Ben Zakkai had stuck his head between his knees for the whole day, no notice would have been taken of him." Said his wife to him, "Is Hanina greater than you are?

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