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A SYNOPTICAL TABLE OF PEACHES AND NECTARINES.

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1

Subdivision 1.

Peaches.

CLASS 1. Leaves deeply

and doubly serrated, having no glands.

Division 2. Middle flowers.

Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters.

Subdivision 2. Nectarines.

Subdivision 1.

Peaches.

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Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2 Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters.

Subdivision 2. Nectarines.

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Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters. Section 1. Pavies. Section 2. Melters.

Subdivision 2.
Nectarines.

Subdivision 1.

Peaches.

Division 3.
Small flowers.

Subdivision 2.
Nectarines.

The names given to some of the English Peaches and Nectarines are so directly at variance with the classification of DUHAMEL*, which, as far as it goes, is unobjectionable, that I cannot avoid observing on them, lest it should be supposed that I acquiesce in so incorrect a nomenclature. The classes of DUHAMEL are four. The first are called Pêches, being those with downy skins, the flesh separating from the stone. The second are called Pavies, being those with downy skins, the flesh adhering to the stone. The third are called Pêches violettes, being those with smooth skins, the flesh separating from the stone. The fourth are called Brugnons, being those with smooth skins, the flesh adhering to the stone. The two last classes include those fruits which we call Nectarines. The names, therefore, which the English gardeners have applied,

* Traité des Arbres Fruitiers, par Duhamel. vol. ii. p. 4.

such as Violet Hâtive* to a Peach, and Brugnon to a Melting Nectarine, are absolutely improper.

In the following list the synonymes, whether French or English, are placed in italics below the name which I consider the proper one to be adopted for the variety. Where the French name belongs to the same kind as an English name, the former is placed as a synonym of the latter.

Some previous explanation and observations are necessary on the authorities from whence the names which I have adopted are derived.

For the English fruits I have taken the enumeration of Miller, in the eighth edition of his Gardener's Dictionary, as the basis of my Catalogue, and have introduced all his kinds, which could be reduced to my arrangement, quoting them as his. In the Epitome of the Hortus Kewensis, and in the Pomona Londinensis of Mr. HOOKER, some kinds are found which appear not to have been known to MILLER; these also are enumerated on their respective authorities. The new varieties mentioned or described in the Transactions of the Horticultural Society have been quoted from that publication. For the French varieties, the authority of DUHAMEL, in his Traité des Arbres Fruitiers, is so paramount, that his kinds have been adopted on his authority. The list has been otherwise completed from the Pomone Française of the Count LELIEUR, the Jardin Fruitier of M. NOISETTE, and the Bon Jardinier for 1829, and also some of the earlier editions.

I have likewise inserted such varieties from the seventh edition of Forsyth's Treatise on Fruit Trees, as had been ascertained previously to that publication ;

* Miller, in his Dictionary, has fallen into an error in describing his Lisle Peach ; he says the French call it La Petite Violette Hâtive, which cannot be correct.

and others from Hanbury, Langley, Parkinson, Ray, and Switzer, to indicate their existence at the time those authors published their works; from the Pomological Magazine, which are new; and some from Nurserymens' Catalogues, which are either not to be found in books, or whose names are synonyms of others.

All the sorts which are inserted in the following arranged list, are so placed either on my own personal knowledge, or on such evidence as may be confidently relied on.

To the whole I have appended an alphabetical list of all the names, whether of Peaches or Nectarines, which are herein noticed.

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PAVIES.

Serrated glandless leaves. Large flowers.

PEACHES. 1. Almond Peach. Hort. Trans. 2. Old Newington. Miller.

Newington. Parkinson.
3. Pavie Madeleine. Duhamel.

Pavie Blanc. Ib.
Pavie Magdeleine. Bon Jard.
Persèque à gros fruit blanc,
Melecoton,

Bon Jard.1822
Merlicoton,

Myrecoton,
4. Smith's Newington. Miller.

Smith's Early Newington. Hitt.
Early Newington. Miller.

Class I, DIVISION 1. SUBDIVISION. 1. Section 2.

Serrated glandless leaves. Large flowers.

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5. Cambray. Forsyth. 6. Cardinal. Lelieur.

La Cardinale. Duhamel.

Cardinale de Furstemberg. Bon Jard. 7. D' Ispahan. Lelieur.

Pêcher de Perse. French Catalogues. 8. Double Montagne. Forsyth.

Montagne. Aiton's Epitome.

Sion. Forsyth. 9. Early Anne. Nursery Catalogues.

Anne. Langley 10. Ford's Seedling. Forsyth. 11. Hemskirke. Nursery Catalogues.

Hemskirk. Langley.
12. Madeleine de Courson. Duhamel.

Madeleine Rouge. Ib.
Rouge Paysanne. Bon Jard.

Red Magdalen. Miller. 13. Malta. Miller.

Italian. Ib.
Pêche de Malte. Duhamel. Lelieur.
Belle de Paris. Bon Jard.

Malte de Normandie. Ib.
14. Montaubon. Miller.
15. New Noblesse. Nursery Catalogues.
16. Noblesse. Aiton's Epitome.

Noblest. Miller.

Mellish's Favourite. Nursery Catalogues. 17. Old Royal Charlotte. Ib. 18. Pêcher Noir. Duhamel.

Pécher Noir d' Orleans. Ib.
Dwarf Orleans. Forsyth.

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