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I N D E X

OF

PRINCIPAL MATTERS.

A.

or omission of it makes no alteration in the sense of the word

48 St. Athanasius cited and explained

142 Attributes applied to the Son, such as can belong to no creature 63

strictly Divine and infinite

65

St. Austin vindicated

348 Author and Governor of the universe,

whosoever is so, is, in the Arian notion, allowed to be God

52

ADORATION, see Worship
Ante-Nicene writers, include the
Son in the one God

15
admit no inferior God 39

disown creature-worship 175 Arians conceal their heretical tenets under Catholic terms 88,

146 are afraid to express their notions clearly

144 have more difficulties to get over than the Catholics 120,

122, 125, 161, 252 the positions of some or other of them in respect of the Son

156 the methods they made use of to propagate their heresy 157

how far they agree with, or differ from, the Sabellians 251

misrepresent the Catholic doctrine

214 their notions of the Trinity not more intelligible than the Catholic

244 supposing the case doubtful, not on so safe a side as the Catholics

336 what is requisite to defend their scheme

340 Ariminum (the Council of) vainly opposed to the Council of Nice

331 Article é before Osos, the addition

VOL. I.

B.
Being, the word bears two senses

119, 232 how distinguished from Person, when applied to the Trinity

232 whether there can be any medium between a Being and not a Being

118 Bull, (Bishop) his method of managing controversy

vi. &c. the sum of the question between him and the Arians 284

C. Characteristics of the true God applied to the Son

63 Christ understood by the ancients

to be meant in those texts which undoubtedly speak of the one

20 А а

supreme God

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Christ spake to the Jews in his own

Person, when he assumed the
titles of the supreme God 24

called God in Scripture in
as high a sense as the Father
himself

41
called Jehovah in his own
Person

42
proved to be God from his
being the object of religious
worship

179
proved to be God by nature.

263
Clemens of Alexandria cited and
vindicated

77
Coeternity of the Logos with the
Father asserted by the ancients

104
Consubstantiality of the Son with

the Father, how eluded by the
Arians, and how asserted by the
ancients

268
Creation, the Scripture meaning of
the word

138
Creation of the universe, attribut-

ed to the Son as much as to the
Father

129
implies an infinite power 135
Creature, the Son asserted to be

uncreated implicitly and con-
sequentially by the holy Scrip-
tures

139
the same affirmed directly
by many of the ancients 140

that he was created, not af-
firmed or supposed by Origen

ibid.
no medium between being a
creature and being essentially
God

148
D.
Divine attributes and powers at-

tributed to the Son, by Dr.
Clarke in an equivocating sense

124
Divinity, how absurdly ascribed to
Christ by the Arians

ix
Dominion, not the full import of
the word God

35, 37, 265
Doxologies of the ancient Church,

what judgment to be made of
them

185
E.
Mr. Emlyn noted 67,71, 133, 229,

292

F.
Fathers, several points instanced

in which they are against the
Arians

278
how cited and made use of
by Dr. Clarke

301
what use to be made of them
in controversies

321
the advantage of a cause
that bas them on its side

323

N

G.
Generation of the Son, a threefold

one asserted by the ancients,
and how distinguished

95
they who assert the genera-
tion of the Logos, or his filiation
to have been temporary; yet as-
sert his existence to have been
coeternal with the Father's 103

how far an explicit profes-
sion of the Son's eternal genera-

tion may be dispensed with 115
God, what the word implies

36
not merely relative 34

denotes substance, and not
dominion only

59
his nature or essence denied
by the Eunomians and some of
the Arians to be above human
comprehension

217

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86

ing them

Son, either in the Scripture, or
I.
by the ancients

6, 15
Jehovah, Christ so called in his Origen's orthodoxy asserted and
own Person

42 vindicated

140, 177, 182
what the word signifies 41
the incommunicable name

P.
of the one true God

46 Person and Being, how they differ,
Ignatius cited and explained 91 when applied to the Trinity 232
Individual, whether any thing in- Personality of the Son, whilst in
dividual can be communicated and with the Father, and before

122 his temporary generation, as-
Irenæus, whether he can be under- serted by the ancients 104

stood to ascribe ignorance to Priority of the Father's order, does
the Son

72 not imply that the Son is a sub-
Judgment committed to the Son, ordinate God

51
not the sole foundation of his
honour

197

S.
Justin Martyr explained 93, 108 Sabellianism, how far it agrees

with, and differs from, Arianism
M.

251
Metaphysics, the Catholics wrong- the medium between that
fully charged with the abuse of and Tritheism

234
them

212, 228

Self-existence, a distinct idea from
Mysteries, what meant by believ-

pecessary existence, and from
218 eternity

a personal, not an essential
N.
character of God

263
Necessary agency no absurdity Semi-Arianism perfect nonsense
117 and contradiction

158
Necessary existence, a distinct Subordination in order, does not

idea from self-existence, and imply an inferiority of nature
from eternity
86

211
an essential character of Subordinate God, the absurdity of
God

263 calling Christ so 3, 38, 39
Nominal God, Christ not exclud-

he being not subordinate in
ed from worship among the no- nature or power, but only in
minal Gods
5 order

130
Novatian, on the Catholic side 9 Substance not joined with relative
his explication of Philip. ii. 6. terms, when understood of any
10 thing extrinsic

35
his belief of Christ's eternity One Divine substance, and

97 not three, professed by the an-
0.
cient Catholics

248
'o (the article) before Osòs makes Supreme God, Christ so, or not
no alteration in the sense of the God at all

3
word

48 Supremacy in order consistent
Omniscience of the Son, as infinite with equality of nature 205
as the Father's
asserted by the Ante-Nicene

T.
writers

77 Time, the word used by Dr.
'Onoovono;, what the word expresses Clarke and the Arians in an
331 equivocating sense

153
One God, or only true God, not as- Trinity in Unity, how far the no-

scribed to the Father, in oppo- tion of it is capable of explana-
sition to, nor exclusive of, the

tion

227
A a 2

70

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