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Fruit of the largest size, of an oval figure, having a deep suture extending from the base to the

apex,

about two inches and a quarter long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a rather deep cavity. Skin thick and leathery, of a yellow colour, tinged with green on the shaded side, and covered with a white bloom. Flesh yellow, rather coarse, and separates from the stone. Juice subacid, somewhat austere,

Ripe in September.

It ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south-east wall, Aug. 20. O. S., or Aug. 31. N. S. Langley.

This has a good deal the appearance of the White Magnum Bonum, but is not so much pointed, of a deeper colour, and, like that, fit only for preserving; but for this it is excellent.

The Wentworth Plum is said, by-Langley, to have been so called from its having been first planted in the gardens of the Right Honourable Thomas Wentworth Earl of Strafford, at Twickenham. MILLER has strangely confounded this with the Monsieur of DUHAMEL, in which he has been followed by MARTYN and Forsyth; but no two plums can be more distinct.

55. WHITE BULLACE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 4.

Branches slender, twiggy, downy. Fruit small, round, mostly growing by pairs. Skin yellowish white, and when fully ripe, a little mottled with red on the sunny side. Flesh greenish white, firm, and closely adheres to the stone. Juice acid, but so tempered by sweetness and roughness as not to be unpleasant, especially after it is mellowed by frost.

Ripe in October

Large quantities of the White Bullace are brought into the market in Norwich, and elsewhere in the county of Norfolk, where they are highly esteemed

for tarts: they are by some preserved by boiling them in

sugar, and in this state they will keep twelve months.

56. WHITE DAMASK. Hort. Soc. Cat. No.71. Petit Damas Blanc. Duhamel, No. 6. t. 3.

Fruit small, nearly globular, about an inch in diameter. Stalk half an inch long, very slender. Skin greenish yellow, rather thick, covered with a thin white bloom. Flesh yellow, melting, and separates from the stone. Juice

Juice sugary, of an agreeable flavour.
Ripe the beginning and middle of September.
57. White Damson. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 88.
White Prune Damson. Nursery Catalogues.

Branches long, smooth. Fruit small, oval, about three inches and a half in its long circumference. Stalk half an inch long, slender. Skin pale yellow, covered with a thin white bloom. Flesh yellow, adhering to the stone. Juice plentiful, a little sugary, mixed with a small portion of acid.

Ripe the middle and end of September.
58. WHITE IMPERATRICE. Pom. Mag. t. 38.
Imperatrice Blanche. Duhamel, 40. t. 18. f. 2.

Die Weisse Kaiserpflaume. Pom. Aust. 2. 33. t. 181. f. 2., according to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit middle-sized, oval, with an indistinct suture, very

blunt at each end; about one inch and three quarters long, and one inch and a half in diameter. Stalk half an inch long, inserted in a narrow cavity. Skin bright yellowish ochre colour, with a slight evanescent bloom. Flesh firm, juicy, sweet, and rather more transparent than that of most plums, separating freely from the stone.

It ripens on a west wall about the beginning of September. It will scarcely succeed as an open standard, except in warm situations.

59. WHITE MAGNUM BONUM. Langley, p. 95. t. 25. fig. 6. Miller, No. 11.

White Mogul. Ib.
White Holland. Ib.
Egg Plum. 16.
Imperiale Blanche. Duhamel, No. 35.

Branches long, smooth. Fruit of the largest size, oval. Skin yellow, covered with a thin white bloom. Flesh yellow, firm, closely adhering to the stone. Juice acid, not fit to be eaten raw, but excellent for sweetmeats. Stone oval, lance-pointed.

Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

It ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south-east wall, Aug. 20.

60. WHITE PERDRIGON. Langley, p. 92. t. 23. fig. 5. Miller, No. 9.

Perdrigon Blanc. Duhamel, No. 30. t. 8.

Branches downy. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat oblong, enlarged towards the apex and tapering a little towards the stalk; about one inch and a quarter long, and the same in diameter. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Skin pale yellow, full of small white specks, with a few red spots on the sunny side, and covered with a thin white bloom. Flesh pale yellow, separating clean from the stone. Juice rich and saccharine. Stone small, lanceolate.

Ripe the beginning of September.

This, as well as the other Perdrigons, is too tender to bear in this country as an open standard, or even in espalier ; it should be planted against an east or south-east wall: on these aspects all the September plums ripen better than on any other, and are more certain in their produce.

A Selection of Plums for a small Garden in the Southern and

Midland Counties of England.

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Northern Counties of England, and Southern of Scotland.

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Propagation. Plums are propagated by budding and grafting upon the Brussels and the Common Plum stock. The former is principally employed for such sorts as are intended to be worked standard high ; it is used also for dwarfs.

The Common stock is used likewise for both standards and dwarfs ; but then the former are worked below, the same as for dwarfs, and the strongest of the plants are allowed to run up for standards.

The Brussels stock is a very useful one for the nurseryman, being a vigorous grower ; if it is planted out one year, and then cut down to the ground, it will throw up a straight, smooth, handsome shoot, six feet high the first year, on which Apricots and Plums may be budded standard high the following summer, and they will make handsome plants at the end of another year; but this excess of vigour in the Brussels stock is not in favour of its durability.

In raising standard Plums, however, I have found it the best way to bud them upon the Common stock, nine inches from the ground. If the stocks are strong and in health, and upon a good soil, they will throw up the vigorous growing sorts standard high the first year ;

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