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overcome the world ; attend prayer, apply promises, lay hold of Christ, and bring him into the heart; if it is by faith we stand, and by faith we walk, then there must be life in it; for what can walk or fight that is dead ! Nay, James tells us, that “ Faith without works is dead;" then faith that can work must be alive. But living faith has what we hope for, which is eternal life, and it is the evidence of things not seen. It is the evidence of a life of glory, being in itself the life of grace, or a living incorruptible seed.

Our poor friend Jenkins is taken from the evil to come. It pleased God to exercise and try him sharply before he went off; but at times his comforts rose very high ; and at the end he was sweetly composed and resigned to the will of God. I saw him but a few days before his death, but did not think he was so near his end. I preached his funeral sermon, which, with his and my letters, and the account of his death, will be published.

Our good old King is still confined, which I am sorry for; because (under God) he has been the protector of the dissenters, and the papists wish him out of the way, that they may come into power, and once more estabpoor sheep in spite of all the wolves; when the joys that are set before us shall make us forget the toils and tribulation we have met with in the world. I say, forget these trials, and so saith God, “ Behold, I create new heavens and a new earth, and the former shall not be remembered or come into mind."

I was afraid these long rains would injure your fens again. My dear friends, adieu !

Yours most affectionately,

W. H. S.S. DCVIII.

Cricklewood, Nov. 28, 1806.

MY DEAR HENRY,

Your mother's letter did not reach my hands till last night, the contents of which grieved me; but we are born to trouble. As soon as I received

mother's account of your request to me, I laid your case and your request before the Lord, with an hope that he would hear and answer for his dear Son's sake; and so (by the will of God) I shall continue to do, in this your calamity. The fear of death, my dear Henry, is common to us all, because we are born sinners; and this fear remains in us until it pleases God to make known his dear Son to us, who is the Saviour of all poor sinners who see and feel their need of him. And, although he is the eternal Son of God, yet he took our whole nature into union with himself, and ever lives in it; so that by his incarnation he is very nearly related to us. Immanuel, God with us,” Matt. i. 23. And, as for our sins, he bore them in his own body on the

your

poor sheep in spite of all the wolves; when the joys that are set before us shall make us forget the toils and tribulation we have met with in the world. I say, forget these trials, and so saith God, “ Behold, I create new heavens and a new earth, and the former shall not be remembered or come into mind.”

I was afraid these long rains would injure your fens again. My dear friends, adieu !

92

Yours most affectionately,

W. H. S.S. DCVIII.

Cricklewood, Nov. 28, 1806.

MY DEAR HENRY,

Your mother's letter did not reach my hands till last night, the contents of which grieved me; but we are born to trouble. As soon as I received your mother's account of your request to me, I laid your case and your request before the Lord, with an hope that he would hear and answer for his dear Son's sake; and so (by the will of God) I shall continue to do, in this your calamity. The fear of death, my dear Henry, is common to us all, because we are born sinners; and this fear remains in us until it pleases God to make known his dear Son to us, who is the Saviour of all poor sinners who see and feel their need of him. And, although he is the eternal Son of God, yet he took our whole nature into union with himself, and ever lives in it; so that by his incarnation he is very nearly related to us. - Immanuel, God with us,” Matt. i. 23. And, as for our sins, he bore them in his own body on the

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