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CONSISTING OF TWELVE NUMBERS, TO BE

PUBLISHED MONTHLY.

FROM JULY 1802 TO JUNE 1803.

TME PROFITS ARISING FROM THE SALE OF THIS MAGAZINE
ARE DEVOTED TO FORM A PERMANENT FUND, THE AN-
NUAL INTEREST OF WHICH IS TO BE APPROPRIA
TED, BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE MISSIONARY
SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT, TO THE SUP-
PORT OF MISSIONS IN THE NEW
AMERICAN SETTLEMENTS, AND

AMONG THE HEATHEN.

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HARTFORD: PRINTED BY HUDSON AND GOODWIN, FOR THE EDITORS.

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I
N the original subscription papers for the publication of the Conneaicut

Evangelical Magazine, the following was mentioned as the plan of the work :

THIS MAGAZINE IS TO CONTAIN :

Essays on the doctrines of Christianity, and on religious, experimental and moral subjects :-Occasional remarks on the fulfilment of fcripture prophecies in the present day, and expositions of difficult and doubtful paffages of scripture :-Religious intelligence concerning the state of Christ's kingdom, throughout the Christian world, and sketches of the original ecclefiaftical concerns of this country : -Information respecting Missions to the new settlements in the United States and among Heathen nations :-Narratives of revivals of religion in particular places together with the distinguishing marks of true and falfe religion :-Accounts of remarkable dispensations of divine Providence : -Biographical sketches of personseminent for piety: Original hymns on evangelical subjects :-Together with whatever else on the subject of religion and morals may contribute to the advancement of genuine piety and pure morality.

This work will consist of original pieces and of extracts from the best European and American publications. As the Magazine is defigned for the promotion of vital Christianity, and of a knowledge of the great and effential truths of the gospel, Essays which are merely controversial or deeply metaphysical, it will be seen, come not within the object of this publication ; nevertheless, should any such be sent which, in the opinion of the Editors, are highly meritorious, they will be admitted. The Magazine will be open to receive communications from all denominations of Christians who believe in the peculiar principles of Christianity; but if written upon the distinguishing tenets of their respective fects, they will be excluded. The profits ariling from the sale of this publication will be appropriated to the support of Missionaries to the Heathen or among the inhabitants of the new settlements.

In pursuance of the above plan two volumes have been published ; and the

generous patronage given to the work induces tke Editors to continue it. Then again solicit the allistance of their Correspondents to enable them to

publish another volume which shall not be inferior to either of the preceding. As the profits of the magazine are wholly devoted to the support of mirons, without any emolument accruing to the Editors, they presume that those who wijl well to the missionary cause will be disposed to encourage this work, even though its intrinsic merit should not be so great as they might otherwise wil. To keep up the spirit of a periodical publication, for any confiderable length of time, is difficult in a country, like ours, where there are few writers fo independent in their circumstances as to be able to write for the public without any prospect of emolument to themselves. But the Editors indulge the hope that in these times of prevailing error, the friends of the truth will feel it their duty to make uncommon exertions ; and that so far as they fall judge this work calculated to advance the cause of truth, they will give it every aid and support in their power.

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FOR THE CONNECTICUT Evan Indian ministers in 1670_ The GELICAL MAGAZINE,

introduction of Rev. John May

hew, son of Rev. Thomas MayAttempts to propagate the gospel a

hew, as a preacher among the Inmong the Indians in New-England and parts adjacent.

dians by their earnest defire

Death, andcharacterof Thomas (Contin. from Vol. II. p. 451.)

Mayhew, Esq.-The care and NUMBER IV.

diligence of Mr. John Mayhew

in the Missionary service-The SECTION II.

measures he pursued to guard the Of the misionary labors of Thomas peopleof his charge against some

Maybew, Esq. among the Indians erroneous opinions, which they on Mariba's Vineyard, and of were in danger of embracing, bis Grandfon, Rev. John May. and which fome had actually enhew, associated with him for a few tertained-The pains he took in years before his death.

private, as well as in public to JUSTICE MAYHEW's pious promote knowledge, and true zeal in the cause of Christianity

religion among the Indians-The impression made upon

His death and character. the mind of a Powow, as well as

vices Mayhew wise, and serious conversation-- Esq. &c. Tho this pious gentleThe means he used to carry on man was deeply affected with the the evangelic work among the loss of such an excellent fonso warmnatives-- The number of profef- ly engaged in the service of his dising Indians on Martha's Vine- vine Saviour ; yet this affliction, yard, and Nantucket, near the heavy, and painful as it was to close of his life, or within a few | the parental heart, did not so afyears after his death—Thetem- | fect, and relax his mind, as to preporary affiftance he received from vent him from a vigorous profecuMr. John Cotton, afterwards tion of the fame bieffed work fo minister of Plymouth--The happily begun, and thus far sucgathering of a church at the cessfully pursued. Vineyard and ordination of tro In this dark, and melancholy

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