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tears of sympathy with the bereaved family and university. A sermon, adapted to the mournful occasion, was preached by the Rev. Mr. Burroughs, of Hanover, from Job xiv. 14. “ If a man die shall he live again ? All the days of my appointed time will I wait till my change come. Thus departed this transitory life that good and great man, whose praise is in all the churches ; whom God was pleased to honor, in opening those springs of science and religion in the wilderness, which make glad the city of God; whose works of charity follow him into the celestial world, where he shines among those who have turned many to righteousness, and as the stars forever and ever.

The following expressive Epitaph, written by Doctor John Wheelock, is inscribed upon his sepulchral monument.

Hic quiescit corpus
ELEAZARI WHEELOCK, S.T. D.
Academiæ Morensis, et Collegii Dartmuthensis,

Fundatoris et primi præsidis.

Evangelio barbaros indomuit ;
"Et excultis nova scientiæ patefecit,

Viator,
I, et imitare,

Si poteris,
Tanta meritorum premia laturus.
MDCCX natus; MDCCLXXIX obiit.

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Here rests the body

of
ELEAZAR WHEELOCK, S. T. D.
Founder and first President

of
Dartmouth College and Moor's Charity School.
By the gospel he subdued the ferocity of the savage;
And to the civilized he opened new paths of science.

Traveller,
Go, if you can, and deserve

The sublime reward of such merit.
He was born in the year 1710; and died in 1779.

Pietate filii Johannis Wheelock.
Hoc monumentum positum inscriptumque fecit.

Anno MDECCX.

Sido

In the Rev. Doctor Pomroy of Hebron, Connecticut, Dr. Wheelock found an able helper and wise counsellor. He was animated with the same ardor, and bestowed much of his time and labor to build up the School, to promote the cause of Jesus Christ among the heathen. No men could be happier in each other. Like David and Jonathan they loved ; their hearts were knit together. They were both subjects of early piety, and members of the same class at College; both were determined to devote themselves to the gospel ministry; they entered on the work together, they settled in contiguous parishes; were brothers by marriage, and congenial souls; it is not strange, therefore, that their hearts glowed with friendship, and that they were always united to promote the work of God and the good of mankind. Many were their pleasant days of mutual visits, for consultation on the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom among the heathen, and often were their hearts united at the throne of grace. Till old age and death their friendship was not dissolved, nor interrupted. Though he was aged and infirm and almost blind, yet on hearing the news of Doctor Wheelock's death, the beloved Pomroy travelled a long journey of a hundred and seventy miles, then a course of rough roads and miry forests, to make a sympathizing visit to the mourning family and university. In the College chapel he preached a sermon, adapted to the melancholy. occasion, from Psalm xlv, 16. From the manuscript the following is an extract, which shows how much he loved him.

“ All thoughts, schemes, plans, devices, how wisely soever concerted for this life, at death are at an end.

Solomon exhorts, 6 Whatsoever. tears of sympathy with the bereaved family and university. A sermon, adapted to the mournful occasion, was preached by the Rev. Mr. Burroughs, of Hanover, from Job xiv. 14. “ If a man die shall he live again? All the days of my appointed time will I wait till my change come. Thus departed this transitory life that good and great man, whose praise is in all the churches ; whom God was pleased to honor, in opening those springs of science and religion in the wilderness, which make glad the city of God; whose works of charity follow him into the celestial world, where he shines among those who have turned many to righteousness, and as the stars forever and ever.

The following expressive Epitaph, written by Doctor John Wheelock, is inscribed upon his sepulchral monument.

Hic quiescit corpus
ELEAZARI WHEELOCK, S.T.D.
Academiæ Morensis, et Collegii Dartmuthensis,

Fundatoris et primi præsidis.

Evangelio barbaros indomuit;
Et excultis nova scientiæ patefecit,

Viator,
I, et imitare,

Si poteris,
Tanta meritorum premia laturus.
MDCCX natus; MDCCLXXIX obiit.

Here rests the body

of
ELEAZAR WHEELOCK, S. T. D.
Founder and first President

of
Dartmouth College and Moor's Charity School.
By the gospel he subdued the ferocity of the savage}
And to the civilized he opened new paths of science.

Traveller,
Go, if you can, and deserve

The sublime reward of such merit.
He was born in the year 1710; and died in 1779.

Pietate filii Johannis Wheelock.
Hoc monumentum positum inscriptumque fecit.

Anno MDCCCX.
Site

In the Rev. Doctor Pomroy of Hebron, Connecticut, Dr. Wheelock found an able helper and wise counsellor. He was animated with the same ardor, and bestowed much of his time and labor to build up the School, to promote the cause of Jesus Christ among the heathen. No men could be happier in each other. Like David and Jonathan they loved ; their hearts were knit together. They were both subjects of early piety, and members of the same class at College; both were determined to devote themselves to the gospel ministry; they entered on the work together ; they settled in contiguous parishes; were brothers by marriage, and congenial souls; it is not strange, therefore, that their hearts glowed with friendship, and that they were always united to promote the work of God and the good of mankind. Many were their pleasant days of mutual visits, for consultation on the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom among the heathen, and often were their hearts united at the throne of

grace.
Till old

age

and death their friendship was not dissolved, nor interrupted. Though he was aged and infirm and almost blind, yet on hearing the news of Doctor Wheelock's death, the beloved Pomroy travelled a long journey of a hundred and seventy miles, then a course of rough roads and miry forests, to make a sympathizing visit to the mourning family and university. In the College chapel he preached a sermon, adapted to the melancholy. occasion, from Psalm xlv, 16. From the manuscript the following is an extract, which shows how much he loved him.

“ All thoughts, schemes, plans, devices, how wisely soever concerted for this life, at death are at an end. Solomon exhorts,

66 Whatsoever.

thine hand findeth to do (for time meaning) do it with thy might.” The motive or argument to enforce the exhortation is, “for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave whither thou goest;” intimating, that good men, while life lasts, are employed in works, and devices, of knowledge and wisdom; plans wisely laid, and vigorously prosecuted, for the advancement of the divine glory, and the good of mankind; and oh ! how did our dear deceased friend, while he lived, abound in all these. Did we ever know such wisdom, policy, and holy skill, joined with such faith, courage, and resolution, to effect the most important and benevolent purposes of this kind, as were conspicuous in him? But oh! how sad is the thought, they are all ceased, all at an end; ceased, ceased forever. No more, O Dartmouth! shall he rack his aching brain, overbear his feeble, and almost wornout constitution for thy emolument-no more fatiguing labors, sleepless nights, mighty wrestlings in prayer for immortal souls, not only of his acquaintance and near akin, but strangers and savages through the land. He has rested, O blessed rest! from all these works; and what a glorious reward does follow them.

But is it cruel in me, my friends, to dwell on this mournful theme, and renew the grief of these deep mourners, and cause their wounds to bleed afresh, four months after the dear object of their sorrows is buried out of sight? We say, out of sight, out of mind. The Psalmist says, forgotten as a dead man-forgotten by the world. And Job says, the womb shall forget him, while the worm feeds sweetly upon him. The tender mother may, and unnaturally enough, forget the son of her womb, when dead, and becomie meat for worms.

All this may be true of vulgar dead;

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