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" An Ambassador is an honest man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country. "
Walton's Lives of Dr. John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, Richard Hooker, George ... - Page 149
by Izaak Walton, Thomas Zouch - 1865 - 386 pages
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The Lives of Dr. John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, Richard Hooker, George ...

Izaak Walton, Thomas Zouch - Biography - 1860 - 386 pages
...Ambassador in these very words : " Legatus est vir bonus, peregre missus ad mentiendum Reipublicte causa." Which Sir Henry Wotton could have been content should...man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country." Henry thought in English. Yet as it was, it slept quietly among other sentences in this Albo, almost...
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The Life and Times of George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, Volume 3

Mrs. A. T. Thomson - 1860
...as being a language common to all that erudite company, but the definition was, in English, this — "An Ambassador is an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country." This sentence was imparted, eight years afterwards, to one of King James's literary opponents, a jealous...
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Chamber's household edition of the dramatic works of ..., Part 28, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1861
...necessity. To lie, is to reside. Hence Sir Henry 'Wotton's punning definition of an ambassador — 'An honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country.' To lie was, then, the term used for the residence of an ambassador. Wotton's definition might have...
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Early English poems, Chaucer to Pope

English poems - 1863
...several embassies, but he lost that monarch's confidence by writing in a friend's album, as a definition, "An ambassador is an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country," which was quoted eight years after by an adversary of the king, as one of the principles on which he...
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THE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

RICHARD GRANT WHITE - 1863
...wrote the best comment 011 this phrase in a passage in one of his letters, first quoted by Heed : " An ambassador is an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country" — a joke which has doubtless converted many a diplomatist to the faith of Dr. Johnson in the matter...
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The book of days, a miscellany of popular antiquities, Volume 1

Robert Chambers - Chronology, Historical - 1862
...in the album of his friend Flecamore, the punning and often quoted definition of an ambassador — an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country. Certainly ambassadors had no good repute for veracity in those days, yet in all probability Wotton's...
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Cassell's illustrated Shakespeare. The plays of ..., Part 178, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1864
...Wootton availed himself of the double meaning of this expression, in his witty definition — '• k, hilt to point, heel to head; and then, to be stopped in, like a strong disti 17. Ajffitcti. Used here for affections, inclinations, propensities. 18. Suggestions. Temptations,...
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The North American Review

1864
...either. One of the most venerable of modern puns is Sir Henry Wotton's slur upon an ambassador as " an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country." So pleased with it was the good knight himself, as to try to give it European currency by translating...
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the north american review

The North American Review.VOL.XCVIII - 1864
...either. One of the most venerable of modern puns is Sir Henry Wotton's slur upon an ambassador as " an honest man sent to lie abroad for the good of his country." So pleased with it was the good knight himself, as to try to give it European currency by translating...
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The American Journal of Education, Volume 15

Henry Barnard - Education - 1865
...translation of an English pun. Walton says that Sir Henry "could have been content that his Latin could j i lie (being the hinge upon which the conceit was to turn) wus not •o expressed in Latin as would admit...
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