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" I tell you, Sir, every Sunday that I go to my parish church, I can build a ship from stem to stern under the sermon ; but, were it to save my soul, under Mr. Whitefield, I could not lay a single plank." Hume * pronounced him the most ingenious preacher... "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 200
1824
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The Christian Witness, and Church Member's Magazine:, Volume 11

Theology - 1854 - 652 pages
...to us as though we had never heard it before.' " Hume, the infidel historian, pronounced Whitfield the most ingenious preacher he had ever heard, and said it was worth going twenty miles to hear him. What an appeal was that which he describes himself as having heard...
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Biographical sketches of eminent Christians, Volume 4

Christians - 1856 - 390 pages
...times was the power of his eloquence felt when no spiritual good followed. On one occasion his words drew from Franklin's pocket the money which that clear,...reasoner had determined not to give : it was for the orphan house in Georgia. "I did not," says the American philosopher, "disapprove of the design; but,...
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Remains, Historical and Literary, Connected with the Palatine ..., Volume 40

Cheshire (England) - 1856 - 364 pages
...remarkable eloquence was perhaps never more exemplified than when his persuasive powers drew from Benjamin Franklin's pocket the money which that clear, cool reasoner had determined not to give for the Orphan House at Savannah. See Southey's Life of Wesley, WhUfield, &c., 8vo, 1824. ('•") And...
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The Juvenile instructor and companion, Volumes 20-21

Young people - 1869 - 684 pages
...intention to break your head ; but God, through your sermon, has broken my heart." David Hume, the sceptic, pronounced him the most ingenious preacher he had ever heard, and said, " It was worth going twenty miles to hear him." Dr. Franklin, the cold and acute philosopher, when once hearing him,...
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The Great Triumphs of Great Men

James Mason - Biography - 1875 - 674 pages
...Mr. Whitefield, I could not lay a single plank.' Hume pronounced him the most ingenious preacher he ever heard, and said it was worth while to go twenty miles to hear him. One of his nights of oratory is related on Mr. Hume's authority. After a solemn pause, Mr. Whitefield...
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A History of Methodism: Comprising a View of the Rise of this Revival of ...

Holland Nimmons McTyeire - Methodism - 1885 - 700 pages
...under the sermon; but were it to save my soul, under Mr. Whitefield, I could not lay a single plank." But perhaps the greatest proof of his persuasive powers...when he drew from Franklin's pocket the money which the author of " Poor Richard " had determined not to give. " I did not," says the philosopher, "approve...
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The Last Words (real and Traditional) of Distinguished Men and Women ...

Frederic Rowland Marvin - Last words - 1900 - 294 pages
...cloak thrown over him, and thus seated, he quietly passed away. " David Hume pronounced Whitefield the most ingenious preacher he had ever heard, and...proof of his persuasive powers was when he drew from Benjamin Franklin's pocket the money which that clear, cool reasoner had determined not to give." Robert...
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The Literary History of Philadelphia

Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer - American literature - 1906 - 562 pages
...William Smith as " Whitefield's mob." David Hume after listening to a discourse by the great preacher said it was worth while to go twenty miles to hear him. Many in Pennsylvania went even farther, and in the neighborhood of Harrisburg he had such an influence...
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The religions of Britain: or a view of its various Christian denominations ...

Charles Hulbert - 1840 - 496 pages
...Whitfleld, I could not lay a single plank.' Hume pronounced him the most ingenious preacher he had e?er heard ; and said, it was worth while to go twenty...to give : it was for the Orphan-house at Savannah. ' 1 did not,' says the American philosopher. ' disapprove of the design ; but as Georgia was then destitute...
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The Quarterly Christian Spectator, Volume 3

Theology - 1821 - 684 pages
...capacity." Vol. II. p. 108. " Hume pronounced him the most тgenious preacher he had ever heard; sod said, it was worth while to go twenty miles to hear him."— Vol. II p. 109. We were surprised to find so littlt in Southey's work descriptive of the personal appearance...
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