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" Let the great Gods That keep this dreadful pother o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch That haft within thee undivulged crimes Unwhipt "
The Monthly Magazine - Page 770
1800
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 78

England - 1855
...of horrid thunder, Kemernber to have heard. Man's nature cannot carry The affliction nor the fear. That keep this dreadful pother o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now I Tremble, thou Lear.— Let the ¡rreat gods wretch hand : Thou perjured, and thou similar man of...
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Vassall Morton: A Novel

Francis Parkman - American fiction - 1856 - 414 pages
...CHAPTEE LXXI. Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground. — Tempest. Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pother...out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged Crimes Unwhipped of justice! Ilide, thou bloody hand; Thou perjured and...
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Cambridge examination papers: a suppl. to the University calendar, 1856-59

Cambridge univ, exam. papers - 1856
...rain, I never Remember to have heard : man's nature cannot carrj Th' affliction, nor the fear. LEAH. Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pother...Find out their enemies now. Tremble thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes Unwhip'd of justice! Hide thee, thou bloody hand; Thou perjured,...
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Vassall Morton: A Novel

Francis Parkman - American fiction - 1856 - 414 pages
...CHAPTER, LXXI. Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground. — Tempest. Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pother o'er our heads, find out their enemies now. Treinlile, thoit wretch, That hast within thee uuJivulged criinrs Unwhipped of justice! Hide, thou...
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Myth and Symbol: Critical Approaches and Applications

Bernice Slote - Literary Criticism - 1963 - 196 pages
...assumptions are often projected onto "the gods." Let the great Gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes, Unwhipp'd of Justice; hide thee, thou bloody hand, Thou perjur'd,...
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The Poetry of Charles Olson: A Primer

Thomas F. Merrill - Poetry - 1982 - 228 pages
...model King Lear's moving appeal on the heath for divine vengeance upon the corruptors of civilization: That keep this dreadful pother o'er our heads, Find...out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes,. . . Let the great gods, (3.2. 49-52) Tansy is an aromatic and...
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Sovereign Shame: A Study of King Lear

William F. Zak - Drama - 1984 - 210 pages
...down a judgment of the heavens upon the wicked. Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch That hast within thee undivulged crimes Unwhipt of justice! Hide thee, thou bloody hand; Thou perjur'd,...
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The Heroic Idiom of Shakespearean Tragedy

James C. Bulman - Drama - 1985 - 254 pages
...revengers and makes them as satiric as Timon's: Let the great gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes, Unwhipp'd of justice! Hide thee, thou bloody hand, Thou perjur'd,...
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King Lear and the Gods

William R. Elton - Drama - 1980 - 299 pages
...this function that the mad Lear hopefully alludes: Let the great Gods, That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads, Find out their enemies now. Tremble, thou wretch, That hast within thee undivulged crimes, Unwbipp'd of Justice; hide thee, thou bloody hand, Thou perjur'd,...
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Melville and the Politics of Identity: From King Lear to Moby-Dick

Julian Markels - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 164 pages
...line as Ahab's “lo you! see the omniscient gods oblivious of suffering man,” such lines of Lear as “Let the great gods, / That keep this dreadful pother o'er our heads, / Find out their enemies now” (III.ii.49—S0). Ahab's thought alters Lear's in specific ways that help define the difference between...
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